October 20

standing in the middle of the theatre at Epidavros

standing in the middle of the theatre at Epidavros

Today we visited Epidavros to experience one of the best preserved ancient Greek theaters.  It was built 2,500 years ago to seat 14,000.  The city state of Epidavros was able to build this amazing theatre due to the income generated by the healing center located here and founded by Asclepius, the mortal son of Apollo.  The theatre itself has amazing acoustics.  If you stand in the center of the stage and speak in a slightly raised voice (Molly) or regular voice (Theo)  you can be heard in the most distant seat.  Interestingly, they don’t know if the amazing acoustics come from expertise or luck, but either way, the limestone seating muffles the sound of those in the seats and amplifies the sound from the stage.

The archaeological site has  a good example of an ancient gymnasium/stadium and the remains of the hospital and hotel.  The two temples on the site have been “reconstructed” using modern material, which we found distracting, as did the professor whose lecture we  surreptitiously  listened to.

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3 responses to “October 20

  1. Espero que esteis muy bien por Grecia.Son preciosas las fotos.Un gran abrazo de mi familia.

  2. Μῆνιν ἄειδε, θεά, Πηληιάδεω Ἀχιλῆος οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί’ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε’ ἔθηκε

    So glad you’re getting to see the Greek ruins in their native habitat. Tell Homer I love him.

    • Nona–
      Wonderful, apropos post. When Lisa told me you had posted something in Greek, I was worried that I would not be able to figure it out. As it happens, it was lines I know by heart! (First lines of the Iliad–“sing, goddess, of the wrath of Achilles, son of Peleus…”)
      We have also been discussing poetry and meter, and have specifically been discussing dactylic hexameter. Thanks for the lovely specimen!
      We are chipping away at our Latin (almost done with Book I, looking forward to Book 2).
      As it turns out, traveling is a great way to give voice to your inner Classics scholar. Thanks so much for the encouragement!
      –Dan
      ps. I have some bad news. It seems Homer died, so I was unable to convey your message. Sigh.

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